California Treatment For Bed Bugs

If you have recently become aware of a potential pest control problem in your home or business here in California, you do not have time to waste with repellents or trap ideas that don’t work! Taking quick action to deal with the problem and guarding your home or business from further invasion is essential in preventing a larger infestation.

Unfortunately there are many old wives tales and ineffective DIY methods spread across the internet and social media. To help put some of these misconceptions to rest, here are top five pest control myths that tend to mislead consumers.

MYTH: A cleanly kept home will not have mice or bugs

Although keeping an immaculate home is an important way to reduce the risk of vermin challenges, it does not guarantee it. Bed bugs, for example can be found everywhere from upscale homes to low-end hotels. The reason for this is that they are not drawn to dirt, clutter, or garbage – they are attracted to blood. Where ever people are living and sleeping, so too might bedbugs!

In fact, adult bed bugs are easily seen with the naked eye. The challenge is that they are nocturnal and they are good at staying hidden during the day.

Mouse Infestation

MYTH: Ultrasonic repellents as deterrents

Ultrasonic devices are designed to use ultra-high frequency sound waves to drive vermin away. It seems like a great idea, but the problem is that manufacturers of these products have yet to support their claims with scientific evidence.

MYTH: Consult a professional expert only when there is a serious problem

Thinking that a problem will clear up on its own is a mistake. By the time you notice the first signs of pests, your home or business here in California you could already be infested. Don’t wait until you have a serious problem before you take action.

If you suspect even the slightest pest control problem, contact a professional to get advice immediately.

6 Reasons to Have Monthly Pest Control Service

Rodent Control Company A crop duster applies low-insecticide bait that is targeted against western corn rootworms.

Pest control refers to the regulation or management of a species defined as a pest, and can be perceived to be detrimental to a person's health, the ecology or the economy. A practitioner of pest control is called an exterminator.

Pest control is at least as old as agriculture, as there has always been a need to keep crops free from pests. In order to maximize food production, it is advantageous to protect crops from competing species of plants, as well as from herbivores competing with humans.

The conventional approach was probably the first to be employed, since it is comparatively easy to destroy weeds by burning them or plowing them under, and to kill larger competing herbivores, such as crows and other birds eating seeds. Techniques such as crop rotation, companion planting (also known as intercropping or mixed cropping), and the selective breeding of pest-resistant cultivars have a long history.

In the UK, following concern about animal welfare, humane pest control and deterrence is gaining ground through the use of animal psychology rather than destruction. For instance, with the urban red fox which territorial behaviour is used against the animal, usually in conjunction with non-injurious chemical repellents. In rural areas of Britain, the use of firearms for pest control is quite common. Airguns are particularly popular for control of small pests such as rats, rabbits and grey squirrels, because of their lower power they can be used in more restrictive spaces such as gardens, where using a firearm would be unsafe.

Chemical pesticides date back 4,500 years, when the Sumerians used sulfur compounds as insecticides. The Rig Veda, which is about 4,000 years old, also mentions the use of poisonous plants for pest control. It was only with the industrialization and mechanization of agriculture in the 18th and 19th century, and the introduction of the insecticides pyrethrum and derris that chemical pest control became widespread. In the 20th century, the discovery of several synthetic insecticides, such as DDT, and herbicides boosted this development. Chemical pest control is still the predominant type of pest control today, although its long-term effects led to a renewed interest in traditional and biological pest control towards the end of the 20th century.

Sign in Ilfracombe, England designed to help control seagull presence

Many pests have only become a problem as a result of the direct actions by humans. Modifying these actions can often substantially reduce the pest problem. In the United States, raccoons caused a nuisance by tearing open refuse sacks. Many householders introduced bins with locking lids, which deterred the raccoons from visiting. House flies tend to accumulate wherever there is human activity and live in close association with people all over the world[1][2] especially where food or food waste is exposed. Similarly, seagulls have become pests at many seaside resorts. Tourists would often feed the birds with scraps of fish and chips, and before long, the birds would rely on this food source and act aggressively towards humans.

Living organisms evolve and increase their resistance to biological, chemical, physical or any other form of control. Unless the target population is completely exterminated or is rendered incapable of reproduction, the surviving population will inevitably acquire a tolerance of whatever pressures are brought to bear - this results in an evolutionary arms race.

Perhaps as far ago as 3000BC in Egypt, cats were being used to control pests of grain stores such as rodents. In 1939/40 a survey discovered that cats could keep a farm's population of rats down to a low level, but could not eliminate them completely. However, if the rats were cleared by trapping or poisoning, farm cats could stop them returning - at least from an area of 50 yards around a barn.[3][4]

Ferrets were domesticated at least by 500 AD in Europe, being used as mousers. Mongooses have been introduced into homes to control rodents and snakes, probably at first by the ancient Egyptians.[5]

Main article: Biological pest control

Biological pest control is the control of one through the control and management of natural predators and parasites. For example: mosquitoes are often controlled by putting Bt Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis, a bacterium that infects and kills mosquito larvae, in local water sources. The treatment has no known negative consequences on the remaining ecology and is safe for humans to drink. The point of biological pest control, or any natural pest control, is to eliminate a pest with minimal harm to the ecological balance of the environment in its present form.[6]

Main article: Mechanical pest control

Mechanical pest control is the use of hands-on techniques as well as simple equipment and devices, that provides a protective barrier between plants and insects. For example: weeds can be controlled by being physically removed from the ground. This is referred to as tillage and is one of the oldest methods of weed control.

Main article: Physical pest control Dog control van, Rekong Peo, Himachal Pradesh, India

Physical pest control is a method of getting rid of insects and small rodents by removing, attacking, setting up barriers that will prevent further destruction of one's plants, or forcing insect infestations to become visual.

Proper waste management and drainage of still water, eliminates the breeding ground of many pests.

Garbage provides food and shelter for many unwanted organisms, as well as an area where still water might collect and be used as a breeding ground by mosquitoes. Communities that have proper garbage collection and disposal, have far less of a problem with rats, cockroaches, mosquitoes, flies and other pests than those that don't.

Open air sewers are ample breeding ground for various pests as well. By building and maintaining a proper sewer system, this problem is eliminated.

Certain spectrums of LED light can "disrupt insects’ breeding".[7]

Poisoned bait is a common method for controlling rat populations, however is not as effective when there are other food sources around, such as garbage. Poisoned meats have been used for centuries for killing off wolves, birds that were seen to threaten crops, and against other creatures. This can be a problem, since a carcass which has been poisoned will kill not only the targeted animal, but also every other animal which feeds on the carcass. Humans have also been killed by coming in contact with poisoned meat, or by eating an animal which had fed on a poisoned carcass. This tool is also used to manage several caterpillars e.g. Spodoptera litura, fruit flies, snails and slugs, crabs etc.

Traditionally, after a sugar cane harvest, the fields are all burned, to kill off any rodents, insects or eggs that might be in the fields.[8]

Historically, in some European countries, when stray dogs and cats became too numerous, local populations gathered together to round up all animals that did not appear to have an owner and kill them.[9] In some nations, teams of rat-catchers work at chasing rats from the field, and killing them with dogs and simple hand tools. Some communities have in the past employed a bounty system, where a town clerk will pay a set fee for every rat head brought in as proof of a rat killing.

In Texas, the Wild Hog population has grown out of control and hunting is the most commonly used way to remove them.

A trap crop is a plant that attracts pests, diverting them from other crops in an agricultural field.[10] This leads to pest aggregation on the trap crop, where they can be more easily and cost effectively controlled using pesticides or control methods.[11] However, trap-cropping, on its own, has often failed to cost effectively reduce pest densities on large commercial scales, without the use of pesticides, possibly due to the pests ability to disperse back into the main field.[11]

Unlike trap crops, most traps used to control pests are man made, and used by rat catchers. A variety of mouse traps and rat traps are available for mice and rats, including snap traps, glue traps and live catch traps. Sticky traps, which often include pheromones to attract the pest, are also a common way of controlling many moth pests, such as Indian mealmoths.

Rodent bait station, Chennai, India

Spraying pesticides by planes, trucks or by hand is a common method of pest control. Crop dusters commonly fly over farmland and spray pesticides to kill off pests that would threaten the crops. However, some pesticides may cause cancer and other health problems, as well as harming wildlife.[12]

A project that involves a structure be covered or sealed airtight followed by the introduction of a penetrating, deadly gas at a killing concentration a long period of time (24-72hrs.). Although expensive, space fumigation targets all life stages of pests.[13]

Residential & commercial building pest control service vehicle, Ypsilanti Township, Michigan

A long term project involving fogging or misting type applicators. Liquid insecticide is dispersed in the atmosphere within a structure. Treatments do not require the evacuation or airtight sealing of a building, allowing most work within the building to continue but at the cost of the penetrating effects. Contact insecticides are generally used, minimizing the long lasting residual effects. On August 10, 1973, the Federal Register printed the definition of Space treatment as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):[13]

Laboratory studies conducted with U-5897 (3-chloro-1,2-propanediol) were attempted in the early 1970s although these proved unsuccessful.[14] Research into sterilization bait is ongoing.

In 2013, New York City tested sterilization traps in a $1.1 million study.[15] The result was a 43% reduction in rat populations.[15] The Chicago Transit Authority plans to test sterilization control in spring 2015.[15] The sterilization method doesn't poison the rats or humans.[15] The product ContraPest was approved for the sterilization of rodents by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in August 2016.[16]

Forest services sometimes destroy all the trees in an area where some are infected with insects, if seen as necessary to prevent the insect species from spreading. Farms infested with certain insects, have been burned entirely, to prevent the pest from spreading elsewhere.

Example of Brown rat infestation

Several wildlife rehabilitation organizations encourage natural form of rodent control through exclusion and predator support and preventing secondary poisoning altogether.[17]

The United States Environmental Protection Agency agrees, noting in its Proposed Risk Mitigation Decision for Nine Rodenticides that “without habitat modification to make areas less attractive to commensal rodents, even eradication will not prevent new populations from recolonizing the habitat.”[18]

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has also prescribed guidelines for natural rodent control[19] as well as for safely trapping them in residential areas and releasing them in the wild[20].


If you have recently become aware of a potential pest control problem in your home or business here in California, you do not have time to waste with repellents or trap ideas that don’t work! Taking quick action to deal with the problem and guarding your home or business from further invasion is essential in preventing a larger infestation.

Unfortunately there are many old wives tales and ineffective DIY methods spread across the internet and social media. To help put some of these misconceptions to rest, here are top five pest control myths that tend to mislead consumers.

MYTH: A cleanly kept home will not have mice or bugs

Although keeping an immaculate home is an important way to reduce the risk of vermin challenges, it does not guarantee it. Bed bugs, for example can be found everywhere from upscale homes to low-end hotels. The reason for this is that they are not drawn to dirt, clutter, or garbage – they are attracted to blood. Where ever people are living and sleeping, so too might bedbugs!

In fact, adult bed bugs are easily seen with the naked eye. The challenge is that they are nocturnal and they are good at staying hidden during the day.

Rodent Control Company

MYTH: Ultrasonic repellents as deterrents

Ultrasonic devices are designed to use ultra-high frequency sound waves to drive vermin away. It seems like a great idea, but the problem is that manufacturers of these products have yet to support their claims with scientific evidence.

MYTH: Consult a professional expert only when there is a serious problem

Thinking that a problem will clear up on its own is a mistake. By the time you notice the first signs of pests, your home or business here in California you could already be infested. Don’t wait until you have a serious problem before you take action.

If you suspect even the slightest pest control problem, contact a professional to get advice immediately.

Billy the Exterminator

Bed Bugs

The German cockroach (Blattella germanica) is a small species of cockroach, typically about 1.1 to 1.6 cm (0.43 to 0.63 in)[1][2] long. In colour it varies from tan to almost black, and it has two dark, roughly parallel, streaks on the pronotum running anteroposteriorly from behind the head to the base of the wings. Although Blattella germanica has wings, it can barely fly, although it may glide when disturbed.[3] Of the few species of cockroach that are domestic pests, it probably is the most widely troublesome example.[4] It is very closely related to the Asian cockroach, and to the casual observer the two appear nearly identical and may be mistaken for each other. However, the Asian cockroach is attracted to light and can fly rather like a moth, while the German cockroach cannot.

Blattella germanica occurs widely in human buildings, but is particularly associated with restaurants, food processing facilities, hotels, and institutional establishments such as nursing homes. In cold climates, they occur only near human dwellings, because they cannot survive severe cold. However, even though they would soon die in the outdoors on their own, German cockroaches have been found as inquilines ("tenants") of human buildings as far north as Alert, Nunavut.[5] Similarly, they have been found as far south as Southern Patagonia.[6]

Previously thought to be a native of Europe, the German cockroach later was considered to have emerged from the region of Ethiopia in Northeast Africa,[7][8] but more recent evidence suggests that it actually originated in Southeast Asia.[4][9] Whatever the truth of the matter, the cockroach's sensitivity to cold might reflect its origin from such warm climates, and its spread as a domiciliary pest since ancient times has resulted from incidental human transport and shelter. The species now is cosmopolitan in distribution, occurring as a household pest on all continents except Antarctica, and on many major islands as well. It accordingly has been given various names in the cultures of many regions. For example, although it is widely known as the "German cockroach" in English-speaking countries, in Germany in turn, it is known as the Russian roach.[10]

Though nocturnal, the German cockroach occasionally appears by day, especially if the population is crowded or has been disturbed. However, sightings are most frequent of an evening, when someone suddenly brings a light into a room deserted after dark, such as a kitchen where they have been scavenging.[11] When excited or frightened, the species emits an unpleasant odor.

German cockroaches are omnivorous scavengers. They are attracted particularly to meats, starches, sugars, and fatty foods. Where a shortage of foodstuffs exists, they may eat household items such as soap, glue, and toothpaste. In famine conditions, they turn cannibalistic, chewing at each other's wings and legs.[12]

The German cockroach reproduces faster than any other residential cockroach,[13] growing from egg to reproductive adult in approximately 50 – 60 days.[14] Once fertilized, a female German cockroach develops an ootheca in her abdomen. The abdomen swells as her eggs develop, until the translucent tip of the ootheca begins to protrude from the end of her abdomen, and by that time the eggs inside are fully sized. The ootheca, at first translucent, soon turns white and then within a few hours it turns pink, progressively darkening until, some 48 hours later, it attains the dark red-brown of the shell of a chestnut. The ootheca has a keel-like ridge along the line where the young emerge, and curls slightly towards that edge as it completes its maturation. A small percentage of the nymphs may hatch while the ootheca is still attached to the female, but the majority emerge some 24 hours after it has detached from the female's body. The newly hatched 3mm-long black nymphs then progress through six or seven instars before becoming sexually mature, but ecdysis is such a hazardous process that nearly half the nymphs die of natural causes before reaching adulthood. Molted skins and dead nymphs are soon eaten by living nymphs present at the time of molting.[13]

The German cockroach is very successful at establishing an ecological niche in buildings, and is resilient in the face of many pest control measures. Reasons include:

German cockroaches are thigmotactic, meaning they prefer confined spaces, and they are small compared to other pest species, so they can hide within small cracks and crevices that are easy to overlook, thereby evading humans and their eradication efforts. Conversely, the seasoned pest controller is alert for cracks and crevices where it is likely to be profitable to place baits or spray surfaces.

To be effective, control measures must be comprehensive, sustained, and systematic; survival of just a few eggs is quite enough to regenerate a nearly exterminated pest population within a few generations, and recolonisation from surrounding populations often is very rapid, too.[12]

Another problem in controlling German cockroaches is the nature of their population behaviour. Though they are not social and practise no organised maternal care, females carry oothecae of 18-50 eggs (average about 32) during incubation until just before hatching, instead of dropping them as most other species of cockroaches do. This protects the eggs from certain classes of predation. Then, after hatching, nymphs largely survive by consuming excretions and moults from adults, thereby establishing their own internal microbial populations and avoiding contact with most insecticidal surface treatments and baits. One effective control is insect growth regulators (IGRs, hydroprene, methoprene, etc.), which act by preventing molting, thus prevent maturation of the various instars. Caulking baseboards and around pipes may prevent the travel of adults from one apartment to another within a building.

Female German cockroach with ootheca

As an adaptive consequence of pest control by poisoned sugar baits, a strain of German cockroaches has emerged that reacts to glucose as distastefully bitter. They refuse to eat sweetened baits, which presents an obstacle to their control, given that baits are an economical and effective means of control. It also is a dramatic illustration of adaptive selection; in the absence of poisoned sweet baits, attraction to sugars strongly promotes growth, energy, and reproduction; cockroaches that are not attracted to sugars take longer to grow and reproduce, whereas in the presence of poisoned sugared baits, sugar avoidance promotes reproduction.[15]


  1. ^ Alan Weaving; Mike Picker; Griffiths, Charles Llewellyn (2003). Field Guide to Insects of South Africa. New Holland Publishers, Ltd. ISBN 1-86872-713-0. 
  2. ^ John A. Jackman; Bastiaan M. Drees (1 March 1998). A Field Guide to Common Texas Insects. Taylor Trade Publishing. pp. 28–. ISBN 978-1-4616-2291-8. 
  3. ^ William J. Bell; Louis M. Roth; Christine A. Nalepa (26 June 2007). Cockroaches: Ecology, Behavior, and Natural History. JHU Press. pp. 33–. ISBN 978-0-8018-8616-4. 
  4. ^ a b Xavier Bonnefoy; Helge Kampen; Kevin Sweeney (2008). Public Health Significance of Urban Pests. World Health Organization. pp. 35–. ISBN 978-92-890-7188-8. 
  5. ^ The insects and arachnids of Canada, part 14, The Grasshoppers, Crickets, and related insects of Canada and adjacent region
  6. ^ Faúndez, E. I. & M. A. Carvajal. 2011. Blattella germanica (Linnaeus, 1767) (Insecta: Blattaria) en la Región de Magallanes. Boletín de Biodiversidad de Chile, 5: 50-55.
  7. ^ Cory, EN; McConnell, HS (1917). Bulletin No. 8: Insects and Rodents Injurious to Stored Products. College Park, Maryland: Maryland State College of Agriculture Extension Service. p. 135. 
  8. ^ Hill, Dennis S. (30 September 2002). Pests of Stored Foodstuffs and their Control. Springer. pp. 145–146. ISBN 978-1-4020-0735-4. 
  9. ^ Eaton, Eric R.; Kaufman, Kenn (2007). Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 62. ISBN 0-618-15310-1. 
  10. ^ Berenbaum, May (1989). Ninety-nine Gnats, Nits, and Nibblers. University of Illinois Press. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-252-06027-4. 
  11. ^ Gary R. Mullen; Lance A. Durden (27 September 2002). Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Academic Press. pp. 33–. ISBN 978-0-08-053607-1. 
  12. ^ a b Rust, Michael K.; Owens, John M.; Reierson, Donald A. (30 November 1994). Understanding and Controlling the German Cockroach. Oxford University Press. pp. 388–. ISBN 978-0-19-534508-7. 
  13. ^ a b Ebeling, Walter. "Urban entomology". Archived from the original on 17 July 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2013. 
  14. ^ http://museumpests.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/German-Cockroach.pdf Museumpests.net Accessed July 15, 2015
  15. ^ Wada-Katsumata, A.; Silverman, J.; Schal, C. (2013). "Changes in Taste Neurons Support the Emergence of an Adaptive Behavior in Cockroaches". Science. 340 (6135): 972–5. PMID 23704571. doi:10.1126/science.1234854.  (summary at BBC News)
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Robinson, William H. (14 April 2005). Urban Insects and Arachnids: A Handbook of Urban Entomology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 45–46, 51–54. ISBN 978-0-521-81253-5. 
  17. ^ a b Bassett, W.H. (12 October 2012). Clay's Handbook of Environmental Health. Routledge. p. 317. ISBN 978-1-135-81033-7. 

If you have recently become aware of a potential pest control problem in your home or business here in California, you do not have time to waste with repellents or trap ideas that don’t work! Taking quick action to deal with the problem and guarding your home or business from further invasion is essential in preventing a larger infestation.

Unfortunately there are many old wives tales and ineffective DIY methods spread across the internet and social media. To help put some of these misconceptions to rest, here are top five pest control myths that tend to mislead consumers.

MYTH: A cleanly kept home will not have mice or bugs

Although keeping an immaculate home is an important way to reduce the risk of vermin challenges, it does not guarantee it. Bed bugs, for example can be found everywhere from upscale homes to low-end hotels. The reason for this is that they are not drawn to dirt, clutter, or garbage – they are attracted to blood. Where ever people are living and sleeping, so too might bedbugs!

In fact, adult bed bugs are easily seen with the naked eye. The challenge is that they are nocturnal and they are good at staying hidden during the day.

Rodent Control Company

MYTH: Ultrasonic repellents as deterrents

Ultrasonic devices are designed to use ultra-high frequency sound waves to drive vermin away. It seems like a great idea, but the problem is that manufacturers of these products have yet to support their claims with scientific evidence.

MYTH: Consult a professional expert only when there is a serious problem

Thinking that a problem will clear up on its own is a mistake. By the time you notice the first signs of pests, your home or business here in California you could already be infested. Don’t wait until you have a serious problem before you take action.

If you suspect even the slightest pest control problem, contact a professional to get advice immediately.

Bird control

Best Exterminator

Pest Control is an exclusive to audio[1]Doctor Who story, produced as part of BBC Books' New Series Adventures line, and the first entry in the series to be produced. Written by author Peter Anghelides[2] and read by series star David Tennant,[1] it is also the first non-televised Doctor Who adventure to feature the companion Donna Noble[1][3] (the first standard printed books featuring her were released in autumn 2008). Pest Control was released on CD on 8 May 2008[1] and is also available for download.[2]


The story is accompanied by an original soundtrack and sound effects created by Simon Hunt.[2]

The Doctor and Donna land on the distant planet of Rescension and find themselves caught in a war between humans and the centaur-like Aquabi. When a far greater threat emerges, the Doctor must convince the two sides to work together before they are all wiped out.